Top 5 Wednesday #57: Books Based on Irish/Celtic Myth

Top 5 Wednesday is a weekly meme hosted by the lovely Samantha and Lainey! You can check the group here for more discussions and topic. It’s been on hiatus for a while now and we still don’t know whether it will coming back or not, but Gabriela @ ValQueenReads took initiatives and have been generating prompts for us for a while now.

I almost missed this week’s topic since I feel like I haven’t read many books based on Irish/Celtic myth but I’m too much of a mythology nerd to pass this up. So I fell down the wikipedia hole of Irish and Celtic myths and it turns out I’ve read 4 series already! These books aren’t necessarily based on Irish and Celtic myth, but they do have some elements of it. Let’s get started!

The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel by Michael Scott (The Morrigan and Scathach)

The Morrigan is the term given to Goddess Morrigan, one of the triple Goddesses in Celtic mythology. She represented the circle of life and was associated with both birth and death. Her name translates to “great queen” or “phantom queen”. She was a shape-shifter and looked over the rivers, fresh water and lakes. She is also described as being the patroness of revenge, magic, priestesses, night, prophecy and witches.

Mythology
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He holds the secret that can end the world.

The truth: Nicholas Flamel was born in Paris on September 28, 1330. Nearly 700 years later, he is acknowledged as the greatest Alchemyst of his day. It is said that he discovered the secret of eternal life.

The records show that he died in 1418.

But his tomb is empty.

The legend: Nicholas Flamel lives. But only because he has been making the elixir of life for centuries. The secret of eternal life is hidden within the book he protects—the Book of Abraham the Mage. It’s the most powerful book that has ever existed. In the wrong hands, it will destroy the world. That’s exactly what Dr. John Dee plans to do when he steals it. Humankind won’t know what’s happening until it’s too late. And if the prophecy is right, Sophie and Josh Newman are the only ones with the power to save the world as we know it.

Sometimes legends are true.

And Sophie and Josh Newman are about to find themselves in the middle of the greatest legend of all time.

Iron Fey by Julie Kagawa (Tir Na Nog)

In Irish mythology Tír na nÓg (Land of the Young) or Tír na hÓige (Land of Youth) is one of the names for the Celtic Otherworld, or perhaps for a part of it. Tír na nÓg is best known from the tale of Oisín and Niamh. Other Old Irish names for the Otherworld include Tír Tairngire (Land of Promise/Promised Land), Tír fo Thuinn (Land under the Wave), Mag Mell (Plain of Delight/Delightful Plain), Ildathach (Multicoloured Place), and Emain Ablach (the Isle of Apple Trees). Similar myths in the northern Celtic cultures include these of Annwn, Fairyland, Avalon and Hy Brasil.

Wikipedia
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Meghan Chase has a secret destiny; one she could never have imagined.

Something has always felt slightly off in Meghan’s life, ever since her father disappeared before her eyes when she was six. She has never quite fit in at school or at home.

When a dark stranger begins watching her from afar, and her prankster best friend becomes strangely protective of her, Meghan senses that everything she’s known is about to change.

But she could never have guessed the truth – that she is the daughter of a mythical faery king and is a pawn in a deadly war. Now Meghan will learn just how far she’ll go to save someone she cares about, to stop a mysterious evil, no faery creature dare face; and to find love with a young prince who might rather see her dead than let her touch his icy heart.

The Accidental Afterlife of Thomas Marsden by Emma Trevayne (Faeries and Changeling)

changeling, also historically referred to as an auf or oaf, is a human-like creature found in folklore and folk religion throughout Europe. A changeling was believed to be a fairy that had been left in place of a human stolen by the fairies.

Wikipedia
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Grave robbing is a messy business. A bad business.

And for Thomas Marsden, on what was an unremarkable spring night in London, it becomes a very spooky business. For lying in an unmarked grave and half covered with dirt is a boy the spitting image of Thomas himself.

This is only the first clue that something very strange is happening. Others follow, but it is a fortune teller’s frightened screams that lead Thomas into a strange world of spiritualists, death and faery folk.

Faery folk with whom Thomas’s life is bizarrely linked. Faery folk who need his help.

Desperate to unearth the truth about himself and where he comes from, Thomas is about to discover magic, and ritual, and that sometimes, just sometimes, the things that make a boy ordinary are what make him extraordinary.

Bandia by Talia Vance (Tuatha De Danann)

Tuatha Dé Danann, (Gaelic: “People of the Goddess Danu”), in Celtic mythology, a race inhabiting Ireland before the arrival of the Milesians (the ancestors of the modern Irish). They were said to have been skilled in magic, and the earliest reference to them relates that, after they were banished from heaven because of their knowledge, they descended on Ireland in a cloud of mist. They were thought to have disappeared into the hills when overcome by the Milesians.

Britannica
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As I step into the room, a silver flash blurs my vision. Before I can take a breath, the world falls away.

Brianna has always felt invisible. People stare right past her, including the one boy she can’t resist, Blake Williams. But everything changes at a house party where Brianna’s charm bracelet slips off and time stands still. In that one frozen, silver moment, Blake not only sees her, he recognizes something deep inside her she’s been hiding even from herself.

Discovering she is descended from Danu, the legendary Bandia of Celtic myth, Brianna finds herself questioning the truth of who she is. And when she accidentally binds her soul to Blake, their mutual attraction becomes undeniable.

But Blake has his own secret, one that could prove deadly for them both. Bound together by forbidden magic, Brianna and Blake find themselves at the heart of an ancient feud that threatens to destroy their lives and their love.

☘ Related post: Book Review: Silver by Talia Vance

Have you read any books with Irish or Celtic mythology?


5 thoughts on “Top 5 Wednesday #57: Books Based on Irish/Celtic Myth

  1. Oh I really enjoyed The Secrets of the Immortal Nicholas Flamel series, but I still haven’t read past the fourth book as there are so many other books calling to me! However, I’m determined to try to finish this series someday 🙂

    Like

  2. I’m a huge fan of mythology as well. I read a lot of books about the Fae, which are heavily influenced by Celtic myth. Maggie Stiefvater’s Lament is a good example

    Swan Maiden by Jules Watson is an interpretation of an Irish saga. I will warn though that it is very sad!

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